News.

Baths for Cheltenham lads in Chelmsford!

There were many Cheltenham boys in the Territorial Force’s 5th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment.  In fact, their commanding officer was Frederick Tarrant, Bursar at Cheltenham Ladies College and among their officers was Cyril Winterbotham, brother of Councillor Percy Winterbotham, who himself later became an officer in the same battalion.  Their sister Clara was Cheltenham’s first woman councillor and became the first female Mayor in 1921.

The Battalion was posted to Chelmsford for training during Christmas 1914 and few of the houses in which the boys were billeted had baths.  The appeal went out from the YMCA to householders to please let the soldiers have a bath now and then.  A system whereby bath tickets were issued allowed the troops to keep clean.

Christmas is coming…

“Christmas is Coming and the Boys are at The Rotunda”

Friday 13th and Monday 16th November 1914 Cheltenham was “invaded” by over 2,000 soldiers of the 9th and 10th Battalions of the Gloucestershire Regiment, billeted in the old, empty houses, mainly in Lansdown.  Officers of the 9th Battalion were billeted at the Queen’s Hotel and 56 sergeants at 2, Queen’s Parade.

The soldiers of the 9th Battalion were fed from a field kitchen, providing useful practice for cooking at the Front.  Aldershot ovens were based in the garden of Bayshill House in Parabola Road, which is now a Cheltenham Ladies College house. 

Bayshill House as it was in 1911.

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The End? Part 2 : Armistice 1918

Monday 11th November 1918  At 10.40 a.m news reached the Echo office by telephone that The Armistice had been signed at 5 a.m. that morning and came into force at 11 a.m.  The discussion between the German delegates and those of the Allies had lasted all night.  A special edition of the newspaper was immediately printed and distributed.

Discover how Cheltenham celebrated an end to fighting.

Stop Press in the Echo “From all parts of the country reports arrive of almost indescribable enthusiasm and public rejoicing.” 

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The End? The final days before Armistice 1918

“In war, truth is the first casualty”, so said Aeschylus.  It is not surprising, therefore, that the news of the impending end of the war was greeted, as Cheltenham’s Rector of the Parish Church Rev H.A. Wilson said, “…with dazzling suddenness”.  Who knew what to believe from newspaper reports in the Echo?  Local and national news was heavily censored to keep up morale on the home front of those who were heartily tired of the war and its effects.  But townspeople knew that, having heard stories from the soldiers home on leave, contradicting what they read in the papers. 

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Collaborative working recognised

We were over the moon to be nominated as a finalist for the APSE -Association for Public Service Excellence awards. Cheltenham Remembers was shortlisted for the ‘Best collaborative Working initiative’ award. 

We didn’t win our category…  However, to be a finalist is a huge achievement in itself and perfect recognition for all the hard work that has gone into this initiative over a number of years by Cheltenham Borough Council  and our amazing partners. This included a whopping 1,800 volunteer days!

A huge thank you to everyone who helped us to make this project possible.

 

 

Recognition for WW1 Projection

Last Friday, Cheltenham Borough Council, along with some key partners, attended the Audio Visual awards in London.

The Cheltenham Remembers projection was nominated for public sector project of the year and we were up against some big international names! We were pipped to the post by the European Parliament.

It was a fascinating evening and we felt incredibly proud of the achievement of being a finalist. 

Ernest Davis & Alfred Moon

Following the Memorial March on 10th November 2018 and WW1 banners displayed along the railings of Montpelier Park we’ve been contacted by some of the relatives of Cheltonians who lost their lives in the First World War. Here Ian Goodridge tells the story of Ernest Davis & Alfred Moon and helps us put a face to the names to ensure they will be remembered.

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